Step of progress America Employees Help you out at Local Adopt-a-Thon in Chiefland, The southwest

CHIEFLAND, Fla.,
July 15, 2021 (Newswire.com) –

Advance America employees in Chiefland, Florida, wanted to raise awareness and bring more attention to local rescue animal shelters that may not get as much recognition as rescues in larger towns and cities. So, the Chiefland Advance America store decided to participate in an adopt-a-thon event to help in Vineyard North. Our employees attended to get involved and lend a helping hand to the community.

A total of 14 rescue facilities and nine local businesses, including Advance America, set up their own informational booths during the event, which was attended by 150-200 people. The Advance America team participated in a raffle by contributing a basket with items including a dog bed, toys, and treats and hosted a plinko game with giveaways for the attendees.

Overall, the event was a success, with community members getting a chance to raise awareness for rescue animals, win prizes, and learn more about the products and services Advance America offers. Lexi’s Kitty Corner Inc. stated, “It is so great that Advance America recognized a need for local rescues and gave us a place to promote and adopt animals. We hope you will consider making this a yearly event.”

15560 US 441 South, Ste. 150 Alachua, FL 32615

2189 NW 11th Dr. Chiefland, FL 32626

2406 N. Main Street Gainesville, FL 32609

2026 SW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32608

1108 NW 76th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32606

4920 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ste. 103 Ocala, FL 34470

2750 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ste. 102 Ocala, FL 34470

3131 SW College Road, Unit #205 Ocala, FL 34474

Source: Advance America

EquipmentShare Completes $230M Investment Round to Improve Technology and Ough. S. Footprint, States News Chief Funding Officer

COLUMBIA, Mo.,
July 15, 2021 (Newswire.com) –

EquipmentShare, an equipment and digital solutions provider serving the construction industry, announces the completion of a $230 million funding round led by Tiger Global Management, The Spruce House Partnership and RedBird Capital Partners, with additional participation from Tru Arrow Partners and existing investors Romulus, Insight Partners and Anchorage Capital Group. These fundraising efforts provide capital for EquipmentShare to launch its core technology solution, T3, the operating system for construction, and expand its suite of technology solutions. This investment round also allows the company to increase its national footprint to better serve the needs of its customers.

“We are grateful to our new and existing investors for joining us on this journey to build connectivity for the construction industry,” EquipmentShare President and Co-founder Willy Schlacks said. “We are eager to leverage this milestone round to launch several initiatives, with the continued goal of empowering contractors and accelerating productivity in construction.”

Founded in 2014 and incorporated in 2015, EquipmentShare has experienced rapid growth, spurred by the demand for its award-winning fleet management technology and equipment solutions. More than a rental company, EquipmentShare is building upon its asset tracking solution to create an ecosystem of connectivity for construction, a sector that has historically been disconnected from technology and lags in productivity gains. The company will soon launch T3, a comprehensive construction technology solution that digitizes and connects the three verticals of construction productivity: assets, people and materials. T3 will give contractors real-time visibility into parts of the jobsite that are historically difficult to track and manage. 

“After meeting Willy, Jabbok, and their team, we were incredibly impressed by what they are building at EquipmentShare. They have not only created a fast-growing, technology-enabled rental business that their customers love, but they are also building software and solutions to make the entire construction industry safer, more efficient, and more productive,” Spruce House Partnership Co-founder Ben Stein said. “We are excited that our investment allows EquipmentShare to run even faster at these ambitious goals.” 

EquipmentShare also announced the appointment of Trevor Schauenberg as its Chief Financial Officer (CFO). For the past 10 months, Schauenberg has served as an Executive Operating Partner and board member. He brings 28 years of progressive leadership experience at General Electric Company (GE) in operational, strategic and financial leadership roles to his newly appointed role of CFO.

“Over the past year, Trevor has demonstrated the leadership qualities needed to take our company to the next level,” CEO and Co-founder of EquipmentShare Jabbok Schlacks said. “It’s been a natural progression to appoint Trevor to the CFO role, and we look forward to building upon this momentum.”

“I’m thrilled to accept the CFO role at EquipmentShare and help the company continue to execute on its strategic growth plans,” Schauenberg said. “After working with the EquipmentShare team as an advisor and board member this past year, I’m convinced we have a differentiated offering that will drive exceptional growth for many years to come.”

EquipmentShare plans to significantly increase its footprint in the U.S. in 2021 to grow its total presence to more than 100 locations. These additional rental, retail and service locations will allow the company to connect with new customers and better serve larger companies nationwide.

As part of its expansion plans, EquipmentShare plans to hire in each new market it enters. Currently, the company hires an average of 100 employees each month. In 2020, Glassdoor named EquipmentShare one of the top growing companies in the country, despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, Forbes named the company on its list of America’s Best Startup Employers based on employee satisfaction, employer reputation and growth for the second consecutive year. 

For more information on EquipmentShare’s equipment and digital solutions, visit equipmentshare.com.

MORE 

About EquipmentShare

Headquartered in Columbia, Mo., EquipmentShare is a nationwide construction solutions provider dedicated to solving industry pain points through smart jobsite technology and equipment rental, retail and service centers. More than a rental company, EquipmentShare’s cloud-connected platform is powered by telematics and machine hardware to give construction and industrial companies a real-time view into the jobsite. EquipmentShare’s enterprise suite is OEM-agnostic and can track any piece of equipment, regardless of brand, to help fleet managers monitor assets, prevent theft and machine misuse, track employee hours and shifts, increase machine utilization, streamline maintenance and prevent unplanned downtime. Founded in 2014 and incorporated in 2015, EquipmentShare employs more than 2,300 team members of diverse perspectives that push the boundaries of possibilities to create unparalleled customer value, support their communities and empower construction professionals to work more efficiently. EquipmentShare’s growing presence of locations, which includes equipment and service yards, research and development sites, dealerships for major brands, administrative offices and specialty solutions locations, serve the rising demand for the company’s equipment and digital solutions. Our company is on a mission that has no summit, working to accelerate productivity for contractors and build connectivity for construction. To learn more, visit equipmentshare.com.

The Spruce House Partnership

The Spruce House Partnership was founded in 2005 to make concentrated, long-term investments in public and private companies led by exceptional founders.

About RedBird Capital Partners 

RedBird Capital Partners is a private investment firm focused on building high-growth companies with flexible, long-term capital in partnership with its Entrepreneur & Family Office Network. Founded by former Goldman Sachs Partner Gerry Cardinale, RedBird today manages $5 billion of capital principally across its Sports, TMT, Financial Services and Consumer industry verticals. RedBird invests with an entrepreneurial, company-building mentality, with an emphasis on capital appreciation and compounding equity returns over longer holding periods. RedBird’s network of business founders and entrepreneurs is central to its investment sourcing strategy, and its highly curated group of limited partners are active co-investors who provide scalable capital support. For more information, please go to www.redbirdcap.com.

About Tru Arrow Partners

Tru Arrow Partners is an investment partnership based in New York, formed specifically to partner with investing families from around the world. The firm’s investing focus is on private growth technology companies primarily in the global internet, software, consumer, and fintech industries.  The firm was founded by Glenn Fuhrman, James Rothschild and Adam Silverschotz. Prior to launching Tru Arrow, Glenn co-founded MSD Capital, L.P., the private investment firm for Michael Dell, the founder and CEO of Dell Technologies, and from 1998 through 2019 served as its Co-Managing Partner. James was co-founder and Managing Partner of West Arrow, a Partner at Lepe Capital and has directed his family investment vehicles for 15 years. Adam was most recently at TCV where he led their investments in ByteDance and Capsule after spending several years at Coatue as a Managing Director in Hong Kong.

About Romulus Capital 

Romulus Capital is an early-stage venture capital firm focused on building, rather than betting on, the next big technology and science-enabled companies. The firm partners with entrepreneurs looking to become industry leaders and works with them to build world-class teams, win major customers, iterate on product, and think strategically about building a strong foundation. The firm was founded by former entrepreneurs in 2008, more information is available at www.romuluscap.com. 

About Insight Partners

Insight Partners is a leading global venture capital and private equity firm investing in high-growth technology and software ScaleUp companies that are driving transformative change in their industries. Founded in 1995, Insight Partners has invested in more than 400 companies worldwide and has raised through a series of funds more than $30 billion in capital commitments. Insight’s mission is to find, fund, and work successfully with visionary executives, providing them with practical, hands-on software expertise to foster long-term success. Across its people and its portfolio, Insight encourages a culture around a belief that ScaleUp companies and growth create opportunity for all. For more information on Insight and all its investments, visit insightpartners.com.

For additional information or media inquiries, please contact:Amy N. Susan, Director of Public Relations & CommunicationsPhone: (573) 890-0609amy.susan@equipmentshare.com

###

Source: EquipmentShare

Cause breaking Lockdowns and Line Closures Creating Regarding Online Flower Situation

MELBOURNE, Australia,
July 16, 2021 (Newswire.com) –

Whether it’s a birthday or other type of celebration, snap lockdowns in Australia and state border closures are keeping friends and family separated on momentous occasions. According to flower delivery Melbourne business Amazing Graze Flowers, while they have been overall negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, the lockdowns and closed borders are also bringing in plenty of business.
Offering same-day flower delivery Melbourne-wide, Amazing Graze Flowers has seen an uptick in people sending flowers to loved ones as they are kept apart on special occasions.
The family-owned and -operated business offers a seamless online ordering process and their extensive range includes bouquets to suit all budgets and occasions.
Amazing Graze Flowers says two of their most popular bunches include the daily arrangement that comes in three sizes and features fresh blooms arranged by the in-house florist, which change daily depending on availability. The other most popular choice is the “trust us” arrangement, which features a large bouquet hand-picked by the florist, according to the shopper’s budget and colour preference. Both arrangements suit any and every occasion.
As Amazing Graze Flowers points out, sending blooms to a loved one is a beautiful way to mark a special occasion. In addition to offering beautiful flower arrangements, Amazing Graze Flowers also has a variety of items people can choose to add to their order, including soy candles, personalised cookies, balloons and sweets. During tough lockdowns, these thoughtful gifts can have a powerful impact on the recipient.
As the pandemic rages on though, times are increasingly tough for small businesses. Relying on the support of locals, Amazing Graze Flowers is amongst the many small businesses in Australia that has struggled to stay afloat over the past year.
Amazing Graze Flowers says when Melbourne was thrown into a sudden lockdown back in February, which coincided with Valentine’s Day, they were left scrambling and were forced to throw away thousands of dollars’ worth of flowers.
Known for their fast flower delivery in Melbourne, the team at Amazing Graze Flowers can help with custom floral arrangements to suit all occasions and budgets. Shop online for same-day flower delivery Melbourne-wide or contact the team for special orders.

Source: Amazing Graze Flowers

How to Sell Food Online in 7 Easy Steps

Do you love to cook or bake? Hold the honor of making a loved one ditch takeout? If you answered yes to either question, chances are you’d love to learn how to sell food online.
Selling food allows you to showcase your creative side while tapping into a highly resilient industry. According to Statista, the food and grocery market value is expected to reach a value of around 4.2 trillion US dollars by 2027. 
Everybody loves great-tasting food, and we all have to eat every day. So regardless of shifting trends in ecommerce, when it comes to selling food online, you should always have an audience. 
But there are some challenges to consider. For example, selling food online means taking extra precautions with your packaging. Forget to list an ingredient or allergy risk, and you could find yourself in trouble with the healthcare authorities.
Fortunately, a little guidance is all you need to start and run a successful online food business. Below is everything you need to know to get started, including how to overcome the challenges associated with selling food online.

Don’t wait for someone else to do it. Hire yourself and start calling the shots.

Get Started Free

How to Start an Online Food Business in 7 Steps
1. Know the Law
Before you can get serious about starting an online food business, you need to know the rules. If you get anything wrong (from your packaging to your ingredients), you put your customers at risk. 
You could even risk huge fines if you’re not following the right regulations. 
Any person in the US planning on selling food from their home needs to follow the “Cottage Food Laws.” This basically means you need to know how to store your food correctly and keep it away from dangerous contaminants, like pets.
You’ll also need:

A state business license
Zoning clearance and permits from your government
Kitchen inspections conducted once per year
Have regular food handling training sessions to keep food safe
License your business in your chosen state. You can do this on the SBA website.

Research the guidelines and regulations in place for food management and selling in your region. 
It’s also worth taking courses on food safety, so you can put your customers’ minds at ease if they have any questions about your food.
2. Choose Your Niche
Food is an extremely broad industry. Although you might be tempted to sell “food for anyone,” the more specific you get with your niche, the more likely you are to stand out. Start by thinking about which food types you’re passionate about. Do you love making bread, or can you whip up a delicious pasta in minutes? 
If you don’t have a specific preference, some initial market research could inspire you. Use a keyword research tool to see what people are currently searching for in the food industry. Alternatively, you can look into trending food ideas, like plant-based meals, vegan products, and artisanal food products. A few niche options include:

Custom cake and novelty foods
Organic, natural, fair-trade foods
Food made for dietary restrictions (Gluten-free or dairy-free)
Gourmet, small-batch, and artisanal foods

If you’re just getting started selling food products online, it might be best to focus on items that don’t require a big investment. For instance, you can make candies, dried herbs, canned products, and baked goods without buying specialist equipment. Keep it simple and fun in the beginning.

3. Find Your Supplier
Whether you’re making food products from scratch or curating items to sell to your audience, you’ll need a reliable supplier. Choosing the correct supplier is essential in the food landscape. The wrong selection puts your brand at risk, but it could also lead to food poisoning and illness in your customers. Make sure you do your due diligence   while preparingto sell food from home. 
When shopping for ingredients and suppliers, take the time to examine the reviews left by other customers. Look for transparency in your suppliers in the form of well-defined supply chains and plenty of information about where products come from. 
If you’re looking for a supplier with specific credentials (like sustainably sourced ingredients), and you can’t find evidence of those facts online, reach out and ask for more information. Any good supplier should be able to provide the information required to put your mind at ease.. 
Ensure your suppliers can also give you products with a decent shelf-life, so you’re not sending out foods nearing an expiration date. You can also boost your chances of keeping food fresh by managing your inventory correctly. First-in-first-out strategies are often best for food.
4. Work on Packaging, Branding, and Labeling
A good brand image is important in any business, but it’s particularly important to get your packaging right when building an online food business. Your branding should be approachable and relevant to the kind of product you’re selling. An all-organic food company might use a lot of natural colors and plant imagery. A business selling custom cupcakes might have a brightly colored, novelty appearance.
Once you’ve got your brand personality nailed down, think about how you’re going to package your food correctly, not just for shelf appeal, but compliance too. The FDA food ingredient and packaging guide highlights the kind of information you’ll need to supply to help customers make the right purchasing decisions. Transparency is crucial with your ingredients. 
Sourcing the right providers for your ingredients will make it easier to ensure you’re aware of every product that goes into your finished goods. There are guidelines available on the web for each country when it comes to labeling rules. 
Go through the FTC fair packaging act and the US food packaging manufacturer directory before creating your packaging. Make sure that the packaging you choose is also suited to the kind of food you’re selling.

5. Price Your Food Products
Pricing can be a tricky process if you’re new to selling food online. On the one hand, you don’t want to charge too little, or your profit margins will suffer. Low prices can also indicate low quality in some parts of the food industry. Alternatively, pricing too high means you risk alienating your audience. Getting the balance right is essential for success.
Start by researching your industry and the prices set by your competitors. This should give you a good starting point to determine the ideal price strategies for your online business. If you believe in the value of your product, or you have something unique to order (like exclusive ingredients), you can price your items at a high margin. Just make sure you know how to show your food’s value to your customer.
Note: Profit margins for food businesses can differ depending on the products they’re selling. For example, breakfast foods have some of the highest margins of any edible offering. In contrast, premium foods like Wagyu beef can be expensive to source, giving you less room to charge a premium.
6. Create Your Online Store
Now you’re almost ready to start selling food online. 
First, however, you’re going to need a website. While you may attract customers from all over the web through blogs, podcasts, and social media, your website will be at the heart of your online food business. 
Start with a well-known store builder like Shopify and design something that appeals to your audience. 

You’ll also need to ensure you’re making your food look as irresistible as possible. In fact, when it comes to selling food online, it would be wise to do your best to make your potential customers salivate! That’s why high-quality product pictures are crucial. Plus, make sure to write epic product descriptions to encourage people to buy. The images and the written content need to compel your website visitors to take action.
You’ll also need:

An About page: To help customers get to know you
A Contact page: For any customer questions
An FAQ page: With information about your suppliers
Any accreditation or certificates: To prove the safety of your products
A blog page: For content marketing
A lead generation strategy: Such as pop-ups or landing pages to encourage people to join your email list. 

Today’s leading store builders come with everything you need to start selling food products online. 
Pro tip: Make sure you know your brand guidelines before you create a website. It’s important to use the same tone of voice, imagery, and colors in all your digital channels — consistent branding ensures your business is easily recognizable across all customer touchpoints.  
7. Promote Your Food Business
Once you’ve got your store setup, you can get to work on promoting your food brand. This is the time to go all-out and make your products as irresistible as possible. There are plenty of great ways to generate attention online. Social media is a great choice for food companies because most people love seeing food snaps on Instagram and Facebook. 
You can post everything from Instagram Stories to TikTok videos of your mouth-watering goodies. Alternatively, why not experiment with some guest blogging? Form a partnership with a well-known food influencer and post about your recipes on their site. Or work directly with an influencer by asking them to help promote your products. 
Other great marketing strategies for selling food online include:

Posting recipes on Pinterest: Visual forums are often a great place to find food customers. Sharing recipes on what people can do with your foods or ingredients can get people excited about your product. 
Offering great deals: Reward your early customers with discount codes, vouchers, and as many deals as possible. Free tasters of new products can also generate more interest in your food, particularly when sent to influencers.
Selling through other companies: You can partner with bigger brands and supermarkets to bring your food into new environments. Just make sure you shop around to ensure you’re getting a good deal when it comes to profit margins. 
Offering cooking education: Get customers excited about your food by providing them learning experiences that help them develop new recipes.

How Much Does It Cost to Start a Small Food Business?
If you’re keen to start selling foods online, you’re probably wondering how much initial investment you need. As mentioned previously, the costs of starting an online food business will depend on a lot of different factors. 
If you plan to open a physical food store (brick and mortar) or launch a new café or restaurant, the initial costs would be higher. A physical space can cost you upwards of $200,000 to run. If you have limited capital for business? Try starting as a small batch producer. Creating food products and selling them from home means you’ll have much lower overheads. You should also find it easier to expand into commercial spaces and unlock new opportunities as your business evolves. 
If you do start your small business from home, make sure you check up on how to get inspections done for your kitchen. It’s also worth working with an accountant to help you determine what you can claim back as a home worker on your tax returns. Don’t want to run your entire company from home? You could consider hiring space for when you’re making your batches.
Conclusion
Running your own online food business is an exciting and often profitable way to bring your entrepreneurial dreams to life. If you’ve got the right ingredients, like a great website, a fantastic product, and a good pricing structure, you’re already on track to a reliable business. 
Just remember, you’ll need to be extra cautious when choosing suppliers, following health and safety rules, and creating food packaging. The food industry is a highly regulated one, and a small mistake could wreak havoc on your business. Be cautious, and always do your research before you jump in.
Summary: How to Start an Online Food Business in 2021

Understand the legalities of selling food online
Choose a profitable niche
Find suppliers for sourcing ingredients
Work on packaging, branding, and labeling
Price your food products
Build your ecommerce store
Market your food business

Want to Learn More?

Best ways to Sell Food Internet based in 7 Basic steps

Do you love to cook or bake? Hold the honor of making a loved one ditch takeout? If you answered yes to either question, chances are you’d love to learn how to sell food online.
Selling food allows you to showcase your creative side while tapping into a highly resilient industry. According to Statista, the food and grocery market value is expected to reach a value of around 4.2 trillion US dollars by 2027. 
Everybody loves great-tasting food, and we all have to eat every day. So regardless of shifting trends in ecommerce, when it comes to selling food online, you should always have an audience. 
But there are some challenges to consider. For example, selling food online means taking extra precautions with your packaging. Forget to list an ingredient or allergy risk, and you could find yourself in trouble with the healthcare authorities.
Fortunately, a little guidance is all you need to start and run a successful online food business. Below is everything you need to know to get started, including how to overcome the challenges associated with selling food online.

Don’t wait for someone else to do it. Hire yourself and start calling the shots.

Get Started Free

How to Start an Online Food Business in 7 Steps
1. Know the Law
Before you can get serious about starting an online food business, you need to know the rules. If you get anything wrong (from your packaging to your ingredients), you put your customers at risk. 
You could even risk huge fines if you’re not following the right regulations. 
Any person in the US planning on selling food from their home needs to follow the “Cottage Food Laws.” This basically means you need to know how to store your food correctly and keep it away from dangerous contaminants, like pets.
You’ll also need:

A state business license
Zoning clearance and permits from your government
Kitchen inspections conducted once per year
Have regular food handling training sessions to keep food safe
License your business in your chosen state. You can do this on the SBA website.

Research the guidelines and regulations in place for food management and selling in your region. 
It’s also worth taking courses on food safety, so you can put your customers’ minds at ease if they have any questions about your food.
2. Choose Your Niche
Food is an extremely broad industry. Although you might be tempted to sell “food for anyone,” the more specific you get with your niche, the more likely you are to stand out. Start by thinking about which food types you’re passionate about. Do you love making bread, or can you whip up a delicious pasta in minutes? 
If you don’t have a specific preference, some initial market research could inspire you. Use a keyword research tool to see what people are currently searching for in the food industry. Alternatively, you can look into trending food ideas, like plant-based meals, vegan products, and artisanal food products. A few niche options include:

Custom cake and novelty foods
Organic, natural, fair-trade foods
Food made for dietary restrictions (Gluten-free or dairy-free)
Gourmet, small-batch, and artisanal foods

If you’re just getting started selling food products online, it might be best to focus on items that don’t require a big investment. For instance, you can make candies, dried herbs, canned products, and baked goods without buying specialist equipment. Keep it simple and fun in the beginning.

3. Find Your Supplier
Whether you’re making food products from scratch or curating items to sell to your audience, you’ll need a reliable supplier. Choosing the correct supplier is essential in the food landscape. The wrong selection puts your brand at risk, but it could also lead to food poisoning and illness in your customers. Make sure you do your due diligence   while preparingto sell food from home. 
When shopping for ingredients and suppliers, take the time to examine the reviews left by other customers. Look for transparency in your suppliers in the form of well-defined supply chains and plenty of information about where products come from. 
If you’re looking for a supplier with specific credentials (like sustainably sourced ingredients), and you can’t find evidence of those facts online, reach out and ask for more information. Any good supplier should be able to provide the information required to put your mind at ease.. 
Ensure your suppliers can also give you products with a decent shelf-life, so you’re not sending out foods nearing an expiration date. You can also boost your chances of keeping food fresh by managing your inventory correctly. First-in-first-out strategies are often best for food.
4. Work on Packaging, Branding, and Labeling
A good brand image is important in any business, but it’s particularly important to get your packaging right when building an online food business. Your branding should be approachable and relevant to the kind of product you’re selling. An all-organic food company might use a lot of natural colors and plant imagery. A business selling custom cupcakes might have a brightly colored, novelty appearance.
Once you’ve got your brand personality nailed down, think about how you’re going to package your food correctly, not just for shelf appeal, but compliance too. The FDA food ingredient and packaging guide highlights the kind of information you’ll need to supply to help customers make the right purchasing decisions. Transparency is crucial with your ingredients. 
Sourcing the right providers for your ingredients will make it easier to ensure you’re aware of every product that goes into your finished goods. There are guidelines available on the web for each country when it comes to labeling rules. 
Go through the FTC fair packaging act and the US food packaging manufacturer directory before creating your packaging. Make sure that the packaging you choose is also suited to the kind of food you’re selling.

5. Price Your Food Products
Pricing can be a tricky process if you’re new to selling food online. On the one hand, you don’t want to charge too little, or your profit margins will suffer. Low prices can also indicate low quality in some parts of the food industry. Alternatively, pricing too high means you risk alienating your audience. Getting the balance right is essential for success.
Start by researching your industry and the prices set by your competitors. This should give you a good starting point to determine the ideal price strategies for your online business. If you believe in the value of your product, or you have something unique to order (like exclusive ingredients), you can price your items at a high margin. Just make sure you know how to show your food’s value to your customer.
Note: Profit margins for food businesses can differ depending on the products they’re selling. For example, breakfast foods have some of the highest margins of any edible offering. In contrast, premium foods like Wagyu beef can be expensive to source, giving you less room to charge a premium.
6. Create Your Online Store
Now you’re almost ready to start selling food online. 
First, however, you’re going to need a website. While you may attract customers from all over the web through blogs, podcasts, and social media, your website will be at the heart of your online food business. 
Start with a well-known store builder like Shopify and design something that appeals to your audience. 

You’ll also need to ensure you’re making your food look as irresistible as possible. In fact, when it comes to selling food online, it would be wise to do your best to make your potential customers salivate! That’s why high-quality product pictures are crucial. Plus, make sure to write epic product descriptions to encourage people to buy. The images and the written content need to compel your website visitors to take action.
You’ll also need:

An About page: To help customers get to know you
A Contact page: For any customer questions
An FAQ page: With information about your suppliers
Any accreditation or certificates: To prove the safety of your products
A blog page: For content marketing
A lead generation strategy: Such as pop-ups or landing pages to encourage people to join your email list. 

Today’s leading store builders come with everything you need to start selling food products online. 
Pro tip: Make sure you know your brand guidelines before you create a website. It’s important to use the same tone of voice, imagery, and colors in all your digital channels — consistent branding ensures your business is easily recognizable across all customer touchpoints.  
7. Promote Your Food Business
Once you’ve got your store setup, you can get to work on promoting your food brand. This is the time to go all-out and make your products as irresistible as possible. There are plenty of great ways to generate attention online. Social media is a great choice for food companies because most people love seeing food snaps on Instagram and Facebook. 
You can post everything from Instagram Stories to TikTok videos of your mouth-watering goodies. Alternatively, why not experiment with some guest blogging? Form a partnership with a well-known food influencer and post about your recipes on their site. Or work directly with an influencer by asking them to help promote your products. 
Other great marketing strategies for selling food online include:

Posting recipes on Pinterest: Visual forums are often a great place to find food customers. Sharing recipes on what people can do with your foods or ingredients can get people excited about your product. 
Offering great deals: Reward your early customers with discount codes, vouchers, and as many deals as possible. Free tasters of new products can also generate more interest in your food, particularly when sent to influencers.
Selling through other companies: You can partner with bigger brands and supermarkets to bring your food into new environments. Just make sure you shop around to ensure you’re getting a good deal when it comes to profit margins. 
Offering cooking education: Get customers excited about your food by providing them learning experiences that help them develop new recipes.

How Much Does It Cost to Start a Small Food Business?
If you’re keen to start selling foods online, you’re probably wondering how much initial investment you need. As mentioned previously, the costs of starting an online food business will depend on a lot of different factors. 
If you plan to open a physical food store (brick and mortar) or launch a new café or restaurant, the initial costs would be higher. A physical space can cost you upwards of $200,000 to run. If you have limited capital for business? Try starting as a small batch producer. Creating food products and selling them from home means you’ll have much lower overheads. You should also find it easier to expand into commercial spaces and unlock new opportunities as your business evolves. 
If you do start your small business from home, make sure you check up on how to get inspections done for your kitchen. It’s also worth working with an accountant to help you determine what you can claim back as a home worker on your tax returns. Don’t want to run your entire company from home? You could consider hiring space for when you’re making your batches.
Conclusion
Running your own online food business is an exciting and often profitable way to bring your entrepreneurial dreams to life. If you’ve got the right ingredients, like a great website, a fantastic product, and a good pricing structure, you’re already on track to a reliable business. 
Just remember, you’ll need to be extra cautious when choosing suppliers, following health and safety rules, and creating food packaging. The food industry is a highly regulated one, and a small mistake could wreak havoc on your business. Be cautious, and always do your research before you jump in.
Summary: How to Start an Online Food Business in 2021

Understand the legalities of selling food online
Choose a profitable niche
Find suppliers for sourcing ingredients
Work on packaging, branding, and labeling
Price your food products
Build your ecommerce store
Market your food business

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Launching the most excellent Shopify Inbox: Immediately Manage Conversations Which means you can Turn More Web browsers Into Buyers

Conversations are critical to commerce—70% of Shopify Inbox conversations are with customers making a purchasing decision. That’s why we’re thrilled to introduce Shopify Inbox (formerly Ping and Shopify Chat) to help you turn browsers into buyers using the power of chat.
We’ve reimagined and simplified our messaging products so it’s even easier for you to manage customer conversations—from anywhere—and sell more over chat.
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Streamline how you manage chat
Chat gives you a fast, personal way to connect with shoppers, meeting them where they are and guiding them from conversation to conversion. But with so many different channels, it’s hard to keep up with all the incoming messages and create a consistent brand experience across each one.
Shopify Inbox streamlines how you manage customer conversations from a single place. You can now customize your chat appearance, saved responses, availability, and more, right from your admin. There are also new conversation metrics to help you easily understand how chat impacts your business, so you can better plan for growth.

When you open up Shopify Inbox, you can get a snapshot of your chat performance, including your conversation volume, response time, and how many of those chats convert to sales.
Never worry about missing a potential sales opportunity. If you’re an admin, you’ll be able to see a real-time count of unread messages so you know exactly when to shift your attention from back-office tasks to the customer who is browsing your store.
Connect with customers in more ways
Your website’s chat isn’t the only place potential customers will reach out. There are so many channels for consumers to choose from—and as a business, you want to be everywhere your potential customers are.
Shopify Inbox makes it easy to extend chat to wherever people shop—and you can manage it all from one place. Quickly connect Shopify Inbox with popular messaging platforms like Facebook Messenger, Apple Business Chat, and—soon—Instagram. And because it’s integrated with Shopify, you can also send products and discounts from your store directly in chat—you’re just a few taps from turning conversations into checkouts.

Sometimes, you don’t need to or can’t have a live conversation. That’s why we’re giving you more flexibility to chat on your terms.
If you’re not available to live chat, you can automatically collect a customer’s contact info and then continue the conversation over email or SMS when it’s more convenient for you. You won’t miss an opportunity if a customer leaves your store or if you have to step away for the evening.
Prioritize the conversations that boost your bottom line
Chat is valuable for more than just providing customer support—it’s become a powerful sales tool. That’s never been more true than in the past year, when more retailers shifted online. During COVID, sales attributed to a chat interaction on Shopify increased by 339%.
When store owners engage in conversation with customers via Shopify Inbox, those customers are 70% more likely to convert. But prioritizing conversations where buyer intent is high can be hard. Shopify Inbox comes with rich data to help you close more sales. When customers start a conversation on your online store or through Apple Business Chat, you can get context on which items they have in—or have removed from—their cart, so you can anticipate potential questions and provide personalized recommendations.

Soon, we’ll also make it easier for you to identify sales opportunities right off the bat. Using automatic chat classification, you can instantly see what a new incoming message is about—be it sizing, inventory, shipping, or a past order. This at-a-glance information will help you prioritize the conversations most likely to lead to a sale and give you the context needed for a personalized shopping experience.
We’ll also surface these topics in your analytics. You’ll have the insights you need to understand what your customers’ most common questions are so you can optimize your FAQ, quick replies, and product descriptions accordingly.
The future of chat is with Shopify Inbox
Messaging is critical to your business. As more and more customers shop and interact with brands online, Shopify Inbox helps you unlock the power of chat as a powerful sales channel. Shopify Inbox makes it easier than ever for you to drive more sales, build strong customer relationships, and spend less time on support—all without leaving Shopify.
We’re excited to continue building more intelligence, insights, and sales tactics into the product to help merchants everywhere create personalized shopping experiences for customers, all inside of the conversation.

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By what method Wood Wood Vehicle toys Uses Shopify Mailbox to Differentiate together with Win Sales

Wood Wood Toys is a Canadian-based wooden-toy store that sells handpicked Montessori-inspired toys. Caretakers from all over the world purchase the toys from the company which was founded by a mom and dad who were looking for toys for their own child.
Before the pandemic hit, business at the online-only toy shop was modest but steady. But COVID-19 impacted the demand for educational toys and changed how they were purchased. Caregivers weren’t able to view toys at brick-and-mortar retailers and needed to be able to trust a fully digital brand to provide toys they’d never played with or touched. The unexpected surge in demand supercharged Wood Wood’s business. Now, co-owner Rennie Wood and his wife, Melody plan to make their ecommerce side gig their sole focus.
But in order to do that, they needed to make some upgrades to their tech stack and their customer experience.
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Implementing Shopify Inbox to manage customer conversations enabled Wood Wood Toys to:

Win a sale eight out of 10 times when they have the opportunity to chat with a shopper
Fulfill every order within 24 hours
Differentiate their business by providing a fast, personal customer experience
Acquire new customers as existing customers age out

The challenge
As the pandemic boosted online sales and brick-and-mortar retailers suffered from store closures, Wood Wood Toys received a lot of the extra traffic. Sales boomed. But Rennie and Melody both still had a nine-to-five job to juggle while staying on top of their growing online business.
Add to that the need to prioritize customer acquisition.
For its first three to four years in business, Wood Wood Toys had a solid base of repeat customers. But as their customers’ children started to age out, there was a renewed focus on customer acquisition.

The only thing we can control is our customer experience and the message and personality of our communication.

This is where they realized customer experience is one of the biggest opportunities for differentiation, especially when Amazon is thrown into the mix. “We have to deal with some of these same lines being sold by third parties or fulfilled by Amazon resellers,” says Rennie. “So even though it’s not coming out of Amazon, it’s still in the Amazon marketplace. The only thing we can control is our customer experience and the message and personality of our communication.”
But with an increasing number of messages to monitor and respond to, customer conversations become labor- and time-intensive. Wood Wood Toys needed a tool that could not only capture all the conversations but also streamline message management at the same time.
The solution
Rennie knew he needed a way to manage customer conversations while improving the customer experience, which would ultimately support the brand’s customer acquisition objectives. So he set some goals.
To create a customer experience that stood out, his goal was to “be hyper responsive, fulfill orders within 24 hours, and add a personal touch,” he says.
And while this level of responsiveness fueled the company’s growth, Rennie knew it wasn’t sustainable to maintain that standard. So he turned to his tech stack and looked for some Shopify apps to help.
Having had experience with clunky plug-ins on Wood Wood’s previous WordPress site, Rennie was eager to find something simple.
“I kind of helped myself to the ‘Made by Shopify’ apps. And almost from day one, that was part of it,” he says. Now, the brand uses Shopify Inbox to streamline customer conversations. “I [didn’t] have to deal with some third-party developer and plug in any code.”
See how Shopify Inbox works
With Shopify Inbox, Wood Wood Toys is able to promptly answer customer queries, cutting down on all the back and forth that comes with email communication. This interaction is key in driving sales, as it allows the brand to get to the customer while they’re in consideration mode, answer their questions, and instill confidence to make the purchase. “With Shopify Inbox, we can deliver a good customer experience, and answer shoppers’ questions accurately, more often, and faster,” Rennie says.
The results
Chat has become a valuable sales tool for Wood Wood Toys. And Shopify Inbox has streamlined the way it manages each chat conversation, as well as customer conversations from other channels. It’s also enabled it to easily prioritize the most important conversations—the ones with high-intent shoppers that have the potential to impact the bottom line.

Shopify Inbox is a powerful tool… It helps me rescue sales after spending time, money, and energy getting a customer to that point. It pays huge dividends.

“People send emails, people Instagram us, people send us Facebook messages,” Rennie says. “The communication comes in from a lot of channels, but having [chat] on the store is nice because I know they’re actually looking at products. We can do a better job of guiding that shopping experience when they’re on the site rather than if it’s happening on an Instagram or a Facebook DM.” And with cart events, Wood Wood Toys can give top-notch help via chat.
Cart events provide context on what items shoppers have in their cart—or have removed—so you can anticipate potential questions and provide personalized recommendations.

Though Shopify Inbox is powerful and packed with features, it’s not too cumbersome for the small-business owner. “But at least for us, as a very small operation, it’s usually just me answering the chats,” Rennie says. “[Shopify Inbox] is simple and effective.”
Wood Wood Toys uses Shopify Inbox in a variety of ways, but two key approaches stand out:
Mimicking the in-store shopping experience through personalized recommendations. Wood Wood Toys uses chat as a place to have a real two-way conversation, not just a place to answer questions. The best chats start with a discussion about what the shopper is looking for, so Rennie can guide them to find the perfect product. “With Shopify Inbox, we can have a text version of that great in-store experience, ask them questions, build rapport, make some thoughtful suggestions, and create a bundle,” he says. “That’s the best kind of situation.”
Saving the sale and answering questions at checkout. Many shoppers turn to chat when they have issues finalizing their purchase decision—these messages from high-intent browsers are super important and an excellent conversion opportunity. Maybe they have questions about inventory availability or their email isn’t working or they didn’t receive the discount code they were expecting. “With Shopify Inbox, I can save those sales that could have been lost because the customer found some kind of communication barrier,” says Rennie.
Having chat available on Wood Wood Toys’ online store helps create trust. So even if a shopper doesn’t have an immediate question, they feel more confident buying knowing that support is only a message away. “Having that subtle pop-up that shows that we’re available, I think that that drives conversion because [it inspires] people to be more confident, to build a bigger basket, and to trust that we’re going to ship them what we say we will.”
Ultimately, Shopify Inbox supports Wood Wood Toys in its growing business and empowers them to deliver a customer experience that drives both retention and acquisition in a sustainable way. “People that use chat are high-intent customers that tend to make purchases,” Rennie says. “I don’t know if I can put a number on it, but I do know that if somebody reaches out with a problem, I bet eight times out of 10 we can solve it and win the sale.”
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So how Covid-19 Helped some sort of Dropshipper to Get Captured Her Comfort Zone as well as begin Her Own Dropshipping Businesses

BrandsGateway’ s successes are about beautiful and motivating a large number of thinking about starting perform dropshipping business. This is why we continuously stock options our customers’ guides, not only of those who sadly are deep in the dropshipping game and are income making big profits but in of those who are first-timers. One of […]

Mozart Piano Sonata when it comes to F Minor (Op. 2 No . 1)

This week’s guest post is by pianist and captain of The Piano Boat, Masayuki Tayama with whom we’re delighted to have embarked upon a project creating detailed walk-throughs of all 32 of Beethoven’s piano sonatas. The first set of videos features Beethoven’s first piano sonata, Op. 2 No. 1, which Masa introduces and shares some thoughts on in this post.  
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Much has been written about the life and works of Ludwig van Beethoven, a man who had a defining impact on the direction of music in and beyond the Classical period as well as the development of the piano itself. Most well-known for his symphonies, concertos and piano sonatas, it is a delight, and at the same time a fearsome undertaking to embark on exploring his Sonata Cycle. Each of these 32 (or nowadays, 35) monumental works introduces something new. However, it’s easy to forget that at the point of writing his very first catalogued sonata, Op.2 No.1, Beethoven would not have known that he would go on to write another thirty one, spanning all the way to Op. 111.
Piano Sonata No. 1 in F Minor
This work bears an overly simple dedication to his then-teacher, Joseph Haydn, from whom Beethoven claimed to have learnt nothing. There may well be an element of truth in this given that Haydn was probably too busy with his own compositions to devote much time to his student. However, there is no doubt Beethoven would have been greatly influenced by Haydn’s works themselves, including their Sturm und Drang elements.
Beethoven’s choice of key for this work, F minor, is unusual as most keyboard compositions at the time were aimed at the keen, privileged amateur pianists and more accessible keys were preferred.  Additionally, as contemporary keyboard instruments were not tuned to the ‘well-tempered’ standards of today, the key of F minor may well have sounded slightly bizarre.
It is folly to believe that he would have chosen this key just to be different for the sake of it. In fact this key, already used by Beethoven in one of his three early sonatas which demonstrates his dramatic characteristics, eventually leads to the great Appassionata Sonata. The temperament and immensely dramatic opening of No.1 does indeed, for the right reasons, stamp his mark in the world of great composers.
Whilst adhering to the more traditional ‘sonata form’ from the Classical period, he does add an extra movement across the set of Op.2. This would normally have been reserved for larger scale works such as symphonies or chamber music and is therefore unique in itself.

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1st Mvt – Allegro
Beethoven didn’t hesitate to borrow material previously explored and at this stage, influence from the Classical period is seen throughout. However, the way he turned the ‘Mannheim Rocket’ theme in Mozart’s G minor symphony into something even more dramatic on a single instrument is uncanny. There are many of his own temperamental traits already displayed in every corner of the music.

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2nd Mvt – Adagio
Here, we find Beethoven adhering more to the Mozartian approach to writing a slow movement. I started playing the piano at a young age, attracted to Mozart’s music, and treasured a yellow-labelled – so it must have been Deutsch Gramophone – cassette tape of Mozart’s last piano concerto No.27. I would attempt to play by ear some of the themes, following which I was then sent to piano lessons. My feelings about Mozart’s music are aptly put in the quote from the film Amadeus, where Salieri describes Mozart’s music as ‘filled with unfulfillable longing’. This really does feel most appropriate in articulating the serene yet almost painful second movement.

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3rd Mvt – Menuetto & Trio
Whilst the other Scherzo third movements in the set of Op. 2 are more light-hearted and jovial, Beethoven adds an enigmatic, almost haunting opening to this brief movement with a more peaceful, contrasting Trio section. There is much to explore in this additional movement with a sense of innovation prevailing.
4th Mvt – Prestissimo
It is intriguing to imagine what the audience at the time felt when first hearing this incredibly dramatic movement. A foresight of his later work, the third movement of Moonlight Sonata, this movement stands on its own merits, serving as a precursor of what was to come. Whilst Haydn in particular wrote hugely contrasting piano sonatas, none compare to the intensity and relentless and temperamental pursuit of drama of this movement which builds to a fiery conclusion.

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Having studied many of the 32 sonatas with some of the world’s greatest pedagogues and performed them extensively, along with Beethoven’s concertos, and subsequently works by Schubert, Brahms and Rachmaninov, revisiting this F minor sonata brought a fresh perspective to my view of the pure genius of Beethoven.
His early works tend to be relegated to ‘study pieces’ at conservatoires, and not often included in concert programmes. They pose unique technical difficulties, some almost impossible to execute as written and performers are much more exposed due to the relatively simple harmonic progressions and melodic writing. This may contribute to the reluctance of pianists to perform them on stage.
It was fascinating to look at practice strategies with knowledge and experience I did not possess as a student, to overcome some of these challenges, and explore the musical detail and depth with which these works can be performed. The 32 sonatas span Beethoven’s lifetime, exhibiting the bridge between the elegant, style gallante of the Classical period and the more direct, personal and emotional output of the Romantic period. They cannot be explored enough and I am thrilled to be embarking on this adventure!
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The full set of eighteen videos in which Masa explores background, style, interpretation, technical challenges and practice methods for each of the four movements of this work is now available on the Online Academy. Click here to view or click here to find out more about the Online Academy.

Beethoven on Board
Our Beethoven on Board series will ultimately feature all 32 of Beethoven’s piano sonatas and is being filmed on board The Piano Boat. The Piano Boat is a new way of bringing classical music to audiences in and around London, surrounded by the intrigue and beauty of the canals.
The boat, Rachmaninov, is designed for and dedicated to musical events, carrying a beautiful Steinway Model A grand piano in the concert saloon. Seating 12 in an exclusive, intimate setting, it offers an experience where spectacular music is at the forefront of your experience on the canals. Click here to find out more.